ZAC PATSALIDES PHOTOGRAPHY

IN DOUBLE

In Double - Double Exposure Photography 

In Double is a surreal photographic series that reveals famous landmarks in a way they haven't been seen before.

Exclusively shot on medium format film with all the manipulations created in camera by using the double exposure technique. In this digital age of Photoshop viewers struggle to comprehend how the images are created without its aid.

In modern Western Society we’ve lost our connection to nature, and we treat it with such little respect. As most of us know, we’re causing the planet great harm by the industrial farming practices, fast fashion, dirty energy, fossil fuels and overpopulation, among other issues.

This series juxtaposes the beauty of man made structures with flowers, trees and the ocean, with the hope people will spend some mindful moments appreciating the the textures, colours and shapes. I used architecture in this series to emphasise how capable we are as a human race. When we collaborate and work together we are able to achieve amazing feats. It exemplifies the need for balance in a modern society. We share this Earth, and moderation is key to its future.

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Double Exposure Photograph of Wat Arun Pagoda, Bagkok, Thailand. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Kodak Portra 160 film.

Harmony - Double Exposure Photo - Buy Prints

Honourable Mention - Chromatic Awards 2018


Harmony - Double Exposure Photo - Buy Prints

Honourable Mention - Chromatic Awards 2018


Harmony - Double Exposure Photo

Wat Arun Temple, Bangkok, with an exposure of a Bonsai Tree in the foreground. Wat Arun is also known as the Temple of Dawn, aptly named as this was the time of day King Taksin arrived at the temple in 1768. I chose to photograph a Buddhist Temple because Buddhism advocates ‘The Middle Path’, or in other words, a life of moderation -something which is absolutely crucial for the survival of future generations on Planet Earth. Quoting the Dalai Lama: “In the present circumstances, no one can afford to assume that someone else will solve their problems. Every individual has a responsibility to help guide our global family in the right direction. Good wishes are not sufficient; we must become actively engaged”. I decided to use the Bonsai tree as the secondary shot because it is largely known to be symbolic of harmony, balance and simplicity, which ties in perfectly with the ‘moderation’ message.

Fire - Double Exposure Photo

A non-native species of plant exposed over the Sydney Opera House. Utzon’s design of the Sydney Opera Housewas considered a groundbreaking piece of modern architecture. His inspiration came from nature; walnuts, palm trees, shells, bird wings and the form of clouds. For me, the image depicts the idea that everything comes from nature, and one day everything will be returned to nature. I chose the red plants (Aloe and Red Hot Poker) as a metaphor for fire. Over the last century, Australian bush fires have increased threefold, primarily due to unstable atmospheric conditions allowing fire plumes to develop higher than they normally would, meaning there are more severe fires at ground level. As Jacques-Yves Cousteau said “For most of history, man has had to fight nature to survive; in this century he is beginning to realise that, in order to survive, he must protect it”.

Double Exposure Photograph of the University of Sydney. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Kodak Ektar 100 film.

Knowledge - Double Exposure Photo

Knowledge - Double Exposure Photo

Knowledge - Double Exposure Photo

The University of Sydney, captured through a window, with an image of an Agave plant as the secondary shot. I decided to photograph the University because “Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress.” - Kofi Annan. In today’s world, the age of information, ignorance is a choice. Education is key to the survival of future generations. I chose to shoot from the perspective of looking through the window to signify bright hopes and vast possibilities for our future generations. I chose the Agave plant because it is symbolic of endurance - and it is “to the one who endures that the final victory comes”. Endurance is key to the survival of our Planet.

Double Exposure Photograph of Harbour Bridge in Sydney, Australia. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Fuji Provia 100. The film is cross processed.

Untitled - Double Exposure Photo

Untitled - Double Exposure Photo

Double Exposure Photograph of Sydney Opera House in Sydney. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Kodak Portra 160 film.

Overflow - Double Exposure Photo

Overflow - Double Exposure Photo

Overflow - Double Exposure

Three Sydney icons can be seen within this double-exposure. The first at the forefront of the frame: Bondi Beach. I decided to overlay Bondi on top of the harbour (Sydney Opera House in the foreground, Sydney Harbour Bridge in the background) as a metaphor for the rising sea levels globally. If you look closely you can see ‘drowning’ tourists in the bottom left hand corner. Over the last century sea levels are estimated to have risen between 4-8 centimetres, and this figure is only going up.

Double Exposure Photograph of Harbour Bridge in Sydney, Australia. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Fuji Provia 100. The film is cross processed.

Reclaim - Double Exposure Photo

Reclaim - Double Exposure Photo

Reclaim - Double Exposure Photo

Prior to 1788 when the first European settlers arrived in Australia, the country was inhabited by Aboriginal people. Aboriginal people lived largely in temporary shelters or ‘Gunya’, and stone houses have also been found. All materials used were natural - wood, clay and rocks. Post 1788, buildings were erected quickly, with the Government House on Norfolk Island being built the very same year. If you stand in any Australian city, it is almost impossible to imagine the country 230 years ago. I decided to double expose Sydney’s most famous landmark, the Harbour Bridge, with a native species, the Eucalyptus tree. I aligned the Eucalyptus tree seamlessly with the bridge to create the illusion of nature reclaiming itself. Given the chance, nature will always win - something the world has forgotten.

Double Exposure Photograph of Sydney Opera House in Sydney. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Kodak Portra 160 film.

Life - Double Exposure Photo

Life - Double Exposure Photo

Life - Double Exposure Photo

A Dragon Blood Tree exposed over the Sydney Opera House. I chose the Dragon Blood Tree,as to me it symbolises life. This life-giving tree itself grows in harsh, arid area, and can survive for hundreds of years in optimal conditions. The tree itself gives in many way; the fruit of the tree is food for birds, and the leaves for goats. The resin of the tree has various medicinal purposes, from treating dysentery to stemming bleeding. The wood of the tree is used in the manufacture of beehives - and as we know bees are the world’s most important pollinator of food crops. Sadly, due to climate change, habitat destruction and over exploitation by humans, it is currently classified as vulnerable.

Double Exposure Photograph of Wat Traimit temple in Bangkok, Temple. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Kodak Portra 160 film.

Interconnected - Double Exposure Photo

Interconnected - Double Exposure Photo

Interconnected - Double Exposure Photo

Wat Traimit in the background, with an image of a pink blossom tree in the foreground. Wat Traimit is home to The Golden Buddha. Buddhism is intrinsically entwined with nature, and this image depicts this message. When Buddha gained enlightenment, he came to the realisation that we are interconnected to everything in this universe - not just other humans, but all beings, Mother Nature and Earth itself.Therefore, the severing of this interconnectedness means death for all beings. When we abuse nature, deplete Earth’s resources and disregard key environmental issues, we are slowly severing these connections. “Since this exists, that exists, and, since this does not exist, that does not exist. That is created because this is created, so if this disappears, that disappears” - Buddha. Essentially, we are one. If we harm the environment, we are harming ourselves. 

Double Exposure Photograph of Sydney CBD. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Kodak Ektar 100 film.

Alien - Double Exposure Photo

Alien - Double Exposure Photo

Alien - Double Exposure Photo

Australia’s ecosystem is one of the most unique and diverse in the world, and its distinctive flora and fauna species began evolving around 140 million years ago when Australia split from the super-continent Gondwana. Since the first European settlers set foot on Australia in 1788, Australia has struggled with alien and invasive species, from Willow trees to European rabbits. Thankfully nowadays this is something that is tightly controlled. This was my inspiration for this particular image, where I have double exposed a Japanese Cherry Blossom tree over the Sydney skyline. My aim was to depict an alternative reality, or an alien-landscape - possibly what the landscape would look like without Australia’s strict Quarantine regulations. The overriding message is perhaps more a statement on modern globalisation - something that is both a blessing and curse for Earth and Mother Nature.

Double Exposure Photograph of the Town Hall Station in Sydney, Australia. This photograph is taken with Hasselblad 500cm on Kodak Ektar 100 film.

Untitled - Double Exposure Photo

Untitled - Double Exposure Photo

Using Format